Monthly Archives: June 2013

The Boyhood of Raleigh

When Quiggins arrives at Sillery’s party, the host asks Mark Members to make room for him on the sofa. Members “drew away his legs, hitherto stretched the length of the sofa, and brought his knees right up to his chin, … Continue reading

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St. Laurence and his Gridiron

Jenkins room at Madame Leroy’s had “a picture in cheerful color’s of St. Laurence and his gridiron (QU 110) The sole adornment of Nick’s austere apartment at Madame Leroy’s boarding house is “a picture, in cheerful colours, of St. Laurence … Continue reading

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An Elderly Grognard

Jenkins, in France for a summer of language study, rides with a taxi driver, who looks like “a Napoleanic grenadier, an elderly grognard … depicted in some academic canvas of patriotic intent” (QU 108). To envision this French taxi driver, we … Continue reading

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Horace Isbister, R.A.

The fashionable Horace Isbister, R.A., painted Templer’s father: “a portrait of himself hanging on the wall above him –the only picture in the room– representing its subject in a blue suit and hard white collar. The canvas, from the hand … Continue reading

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Jean Templer recalls Old Master drawings.

The Narrator recalls his first glimpse of Peter Templer’s sister Jean: “her face was thin and attenuated, the whole appearance given the effect of a much simplified — and somewhat self-conscious — arrangement of lines and planes, such as might … Continue reading

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Embarkation Scenes from Claude Lorraine

Jenkins goes with his friend Peter Templer to visit the Templer home, set on a cliff above the sea. Jenkins first sees the enormous villa with a backdrop of clouds and olive green waves as “a sea-palace for a version … Continue reading

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Mrs. Foxe’s Apartment

In about 1921 Jenkins visits Stringham’s mother, Mrs. Foxe, and stepfather, Buster, at their Berkeley Square apartment, whose opulence takes Nicholas back a century.  He enters the library,  “generally crimson in effect, containing a couple of large Regency bookcases. A … Continue reading

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