Monthly Archives: February 2014

Reynolds, Boucher, Renoir

In a protracted exchange with Nick, Barnby insists on the truth-telling ability of painting over writing where women are concerned: “Writers always seem to defer to the wishes of the women themselves.”  Nick replies, “So do painters.  What about Reynolds … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Snowy Sisley Landscape

Driving to the Templer home on a snowy night with Templer,  Mona, and Jean,  Nick writes of Mona, “ . . . she jumped out of her side of the car, and ran across the Sisley landscape to the front … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Delacroix’s Femmes d’Algers dans leur apartement

At his weekend visit to Peter Templer’s, Nick once again meets Peter’s sister Jean, now Jean Duport.  “Once she had reminded me of Rubens’s Chapeau de Paille.  Now for some reason––though there was not much physical likeness between them––I thought … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Nymph at the Ritz

Jenkins, waiting to meet Mark Members at the Palm Court at the Ritz Hotel, gazes on a South American family seated in front of the fountain. “Away on her pinnacle, the nymph seemed at once a member of this Latin … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Isbister, “The British Frans Hals”

When Isbister died, one of the death notices called him “the British Frans Hals.” [AW 36/30] We will start with an art history quiz: Which is true of Hals (Dutch ~1582-1666)? A. He, along with Rembrandt and Vermeer, is one … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

St. John Clarke’s Artistic Conversion

Barnby and Jenkins are discussing the prospect of St. John Clarke writing an introduction to the book on Isbister’s paintings. We have already learned some of Clarke’s artistic tastes from his comments on the Keningston Garden statues. In the dialogue, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

St. John Clarke and the Kensington Garden Sculptures

Jenkins discusses St. John Clarke’s interest in art and his suitability to write an introduction to The Art of Horace Isbister: “That a well-known novelist should take on something that seemed to call in at least a small degree for … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment