Monthly Archives: December 2014

Raphael’s La Madonna della Sedia

Nick muses on both the likely and unlikely aspects of his friendship with Moreland.  A list of their shared childhood prejudices makes it seem as if they had known each other long before they had met, and includes a “capricious … Continue reading

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The Literary Content of Some Picassos

Moreland is talking to Maclintick, who is drunk and depressed. Maclintick is bemoaning how his wife Audrey treats him; Moreland sees a parallel: “It wasn’t for nothing that Petrach’s Laura was one of the de Sade family.”[CCR 204/212 ] Petrarch (1304-1374), the Italian … Continue reading

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Fauvism and Surrealism

We will mention some references to art movements in CCR almost as briefly as Powell does. Stringham refers to his former sister-in-law Anne Stepney “chattering away about Braque and Dufy.” [CCR 170/175] This is a reprise of an similar statement he made … Continue reading

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Isbister according to St. John Clarke

Jenkins reflected after St. John Clarke’s death: “If so tortuous a comparison of mediocre talent could ever be resolved, St John Clarke was probably to be judged a ‘better’ writer than Isbister was a painter.” [CCR 184/190 ] Mark Members recalled … Continue reading

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Lely’s Portrait of Judge Jeffreys

After discussing the attribution of the Prince Rupert, Lord Huntercombe continues his rivalry with Smethyck: “I was even able to carry the war into Smethyck’s country by enquiring whether he felt absolutely confident of the supposed portrait of Judge Jeffreys, … Continue reading

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William Dobson

Lord Huntercomb said, “Smethyk showed  himself anxious to point out that my Prince Rupert Conversing with a Herald was painted by Dobson, rather than Van Dyck. Fortunatley I had long ago come to the same conclusion and recently caused its … Continue reading

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Vienna porcelain mixed up with the Meissen

Jenkins encounters Lord Huntercombe at Mrs. Foxe’s reception. They are in the libary where Jenkins had first seen the Romney years before.  Now the copy of Truth Unveiled by Time is on display. After Lord Huntercombe examines it, he “smiles wryly” at … Continue reading

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