An Ironside in a Victorian Illustration

Jenkins describes Company-Sergeant Major Cadwallader as “cleanshaven, with the severely puritanical countenance of an Ironside in a Victorian illustration to a Cavalier-and-Roundhead romance.” [VB 10/6].

Cromwell and Lady Fauconberg P. Lightfoot after a painting by A. Chisholm, 1838 Steel engraving , 8 x 10 in  from Sir Walter Scott Woodstock, chapter 8 from the Walter Scott Image Collection, University of Edinburgh

Cromwell and Lady Fauconberg
P. Lightfoot after a painting by A. Chisholm, 1838
Steel engraving , 8 x 10 in
from Sir Walter Scott Woodstock, chapter 8
from the Walter Scott Image Collection, University of Edinburgh

Oliver Cromwell George Cattermole engraving from drawing from Cattermole, Richard Great Civil War or The Times of Charles I. and Cromwell, Henry G. Bohn, London, 1852 via Google Books

Oliver Cromwell
George Cattermole
engraving from drawing
from Cattermole, Richard
Great Civil War or The Times of Charles I. and Cromwell,
Henry G. Bohn, London, 1852
via Google Books

The English Civil Wars (1642-1651) pitted the Cavaliers (followers of King Charles I and King Charles II) against the Roundheads (Parliamentarians or followers of Oliver Cromwell). The Roundheads were named for their bowl-like haircuts; their troops were called Ironsides, because Old Ironsides was one of Cromwell’s nicknames. Many romantic novels have been written about this era. A pre-Victorian example is Sir Walter Scott’s Woodstock, or the Cavalier (1826).  We have not found the illustration that Jenkins recalls, but the image at the left qualifies as Victorian (1837-1901) and shows Cromwell with a portrait of Charles I by Van Dyck.  Another Victorian source of engraved illustrations is the history Great Civil War or The Times of Charles I. and Cromwell, written by Richard Cattermole and illustrated by George Cattermole.

And When Did You Last See Your Father William Frederick Yeames, 1878 oil on canvas, 52 x 99 in The Walker Gallery of Art photo in public domain from Wikimedia.org via the Google Art Project

And When Did You Last See Your Father
William Frederick Yeames, 1878
oil on canvas, 52 x 99 in
The Walker Gallery of Art
photo in public domain from Wikimedia.org via the Google Art Project

,

For a Victorian image of Roundheads, we can turn to the painting above by William Frederick Yeames.   The Roundhead officer seated in the center wears an orange sash, which was characteristic Ironside attire. We know that the Ironside standing to his left is a sergeant because the halberd in his left hand is a sign of rank.  To imagine Cadwallader, we will just need to shave the mustache from his stern face.

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